Posts tagged ‘Taxes’

December 30, 2012

Clearing the tabs…12/30/2012

by thoughtfulconservative

Secretary of State Clinton hospitalized. I guess it turned out to be more than “Benghazi flu” after all… Prayers for Secretary Clinton and her health.

How to prepare financially for 2013 despite fiscal cliff. Step one: Don’t panic. Step 2: Prepare for the worst. That’s when I panic. Step 3: Turn investments into cash…Yeah, right.

Farmer cites religious issues in raw milk case. May be behind a “pay wall.” Sorry.

Immigration reform could get overshadowed in Congress. By what? Oh….yeah…forgot.

Red-light cameras run up $7.6 million in fines in first year. Look for this revenue stream to come to a community near you soon.

French court throws out Hollande’s tax on rich. America should be so lucky.

And last but certainly not least, Obama signs FISA warrantless wiretapping program extension into law. It’s nice to know that while the government might not be able to pay its bills, it will still be able to spy on its citizens. Kohl, Johnson and Sensenbrenner all voted “Yes.”

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June 4, 2010

“How Christian is Tea Party Libertarianism?”

by thoughtfulconservative

Jim Wallis, of Sojourners and the author of God’s Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn’t Get It which I reviewed awhile back (There is no link anymore, once again thanks to Google), wrote a post simultaneously posted on Huffington Post and God’s Politics on the Tea Party.

I can agree with Jim Wallis on some things, but on most things I would disagree. From this article, it doesn’t appear as though Mr. Wallis knows what the Tea Party is.

This comes out immediately in the title. Mr. Wallis links Tea Parties with libertarianism. My sense is that there are some Tea Partiers that are libertarian there are some who are not libertarian, mostly Republican with a few independents and even Democrats. That’s not to say that libertarianism is not an undercurrent as he points out has been evident in the Republican Party.

I hold some viewpoints in common with libertarianism, but I’m not libertarian.

Painting with a broad brush necessitates making some points that aren’t true for the whole. And instead of looking at the Tea Partiers, Wallis seems to be rebutting libertarianism, or those things that Tea Partiers believe that are the same as what libertarians believe. those points Wallis contends are:

  1. The Libertarian enshrinement of individual choice is not the pre-eminent Christian virtue.
  2. Not so. Although perhaps not a virtue, individual choice is the foundation of Christianity. We come to Christ by our individual choice. We are exhorted to live Christ-like in this world, but are not forced to do so. We are our brother’s keeper, but again that’s a choice we make as the Holy Spirit directs us, not one that the government, or anyone else can coerce us to do.

    Wallis tries to prove his point by going to the Old Testament prophets, but we must remember that Israel was God’s people on earth, something only a Christian dominionist might contend today. God’s People on earth should exemplify these characteristics, but all political parties fall short here.

  3. An anti-government ideology just isn’t biblical.
  4. Mr. Wallis erects somewhat of a straw man here, as he says later, “Of course, debating the size and role of government is always a fair and good discussion, and most of us would prefer smart and effective to ‘big’ or ‘small’ government.” I think that’s what the discussion IS about as I believe wanting to get rid of all government is called anarchy. And I think most clear thinking Tea Partiers and Libertarians would concede some taxes are necessary. They just think taxes are too high.

    He then puts on his rose colored glasses and states, “a power-hungry government is clearly an aberration.” Apparently he and I are not examining the same government. Eminent domain, police abuse, bureaucratic malfeasance seems pretty common.

  5. The Libertarians’ supreme confidence in the market is not consistent with a biblical view of human nature and sin.
  6. This might be the area I agree with most and it’s not limited to libertarians; many conservatives feel the same way. In a previous post I thought aloud about some things concerning government regulation. Wallis gave me this food for thought:

    Should big oil companies like BP simply be allowed to spew oil into the ocean? And is regulating them really un-American? Do we really want nobody to inspect our meat, make sure our kids’ toys are safe, or police the polluters to keep our air clean? Do we really want owners of restaurants and hotels to be able to decide whom they will or won’t serve, or should liquor store owners also be able to sell alcohol to our kids? Given the reality of sin in all human institutions, doesn’t a political process that provides both accountability and checks and balances make both theological and practical sense? C.S. Lewis once said that we need democracy not because people are essentially good, but because they often are not. Democratic accountability is essential to preventing the market from becoming a beast of corporate totalitarianism…”

    Some would argue we were fine for hundreds or thousands of years without government regulation, but I’m not sure that’s a valid argument. Others have argued that regulation is the cause of some of these problems.

  7. The Libertarian preference for the strong over the weak is decidedly un-Christian.
  8. He shows his hand with this sentence:

    “[P]rivate charity is simply not enough to satisfy the demands of either fairness or justice, let alone compassion.”

    There you have it. Jim Wallis’s position as succinctly as you can get it. Private charity is not enough. We have to redistribute wealth by government decree.

    And here, oddly enough, is where Wallis could possibly come closest to agreeing with conservatives and libertarians.

    “When the system is designed to protect the privileges of the already strong and make the weak even more defenseless and vulnerable, something is wrong with the system.”

    The system could be construed as being the government in some arguments.

  9. There is something wrong with a political movement like the Tea Party which is almost all white. …would there even be a Tea Party if the president of the United States weren’t the first black man to occupy that office?

This is his big finish? To answer the second question first, who knows? McCain was not that popular among conservatives or libertarians, so maybe, maybe not. And it’s hard for me to label a whole movement racist when there are African-Americans at the rallies, although no doubt as Wallis says, there are probably some racists attached to the movement. We even have an African-American writer taking the libertarian side on The Civil Rights Act (though most African-Americans would no doubt dispute that he is a valid speaker for the African-American community)!

It seems as though Mr. Wallis needs to learn some more about the Tea Partiers as part of his “dialogue.”

<a href=”http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0060834471?ie=UTF8&tag=musingsofatho-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0060834471″>God’s Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn’t Get It</a><img src=”http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=musingsofatho-20&l=as2&o=1&a=0060834471&#8243; width=”1″ height=”1″ border=”0″ alt=”” style=”border:none !important; margin:0px !important;” />

February 17, 2009

Quote of the day 02/17/2009

by thoughtfulconservative

Today’s quote comes WGN part time radio personality Dan Deibert at his blog The D Spot. Speaking about the Kansas delay of tax refund payments,

This is like walking into Target… buying a bunch of stuff that comes up to $75, handing them a $100 bill and them telling you they are having budget problems and are going to keep your change.

Bookmark Quote of the day 02/17/2009

February 7, 2009

Saturday Snippets

by thoughtfulconservative

For your reading pleasure while I go to Mayfair Mall.

Boxer Urges Quick Handover of U.S. Power to UN

The UNCRC imposes on all treaty signatories power over laws concerning children and, by extension, families. The largest portion of laws concerning children and families in the U.S. are state statutes so this treaty would, in actual fact, eliminate all family laws in the various states and hand the power over this area of law to the U.N. as per the Supremacy Clause to the U.S. Constitution (Article V1) that states that treaties preempt state laws.

Boxer is eager to destroy the entire lot of family laws throughout the country supposedly to protect “the most vulnerable people of society.”

Maybe. Maybe not. Every so often we read something like this where some politician is going to give up US sovereignty for some UN mandate.

I’m still waiting. Watchful, but waiting.

A God-shaped hole? via THE Right Side of Wisconsin

The Man the Left Wants Hanged for Tax Cheating by Warner Todd_Huston

Tax troubles were all the rage for certain folks recently. ABC News screamed in a headline about one fellow that was, “America’s Overnight Sensation… Owes $1,200 in Taxes.” Huffintgon Post was all up in arms over the same story. The San Francisco Chronicle was tsking the fellow for being “concerned about increased taxes – but hasn’t paid his own income taxes.” The Chicago Tribune chided this figure for being “delinquent on his taxes.” It was a crime, they all said. An outrage. This is not to even mention the unhinged, screaming mimis of the left blogosphere that dug in like pitbulls to excoriate this notorious tax cheat.

No, you know how this works. You have to read the whole thing to find out who.

Gmail Labs: Ten Gmail Labs Features You Should Enable. Yes, I still use Gmail, with caution.

Gmail has been slowly but surely rolling out cool new features ever since they started Gmail Labs. If you haven’t taken advantage of the fruits of Labs, here’s a look at 10 Labs features you should enable.

25 Random Tips for the Busy Facebook User. Been hit with one of those lists requests, yet? You will be.

A Times analysis of 2.5 million lists (okay, maybe more like six or seven) yielded the following formula for the perfect list, which we offer in the interest of – well, which we offer, anyway, in case someone wants to read it.

Hot Air reports, Scandal for Steele? Do Republicans have scandal (again)?

Federal investigators have begun looking into claims that Steele diverted campaign funds from his 2006 Senatorial run in Maryland to family members, but the Post has found at least some support for Steele as well.

Palin’s Explanation Brings Out the Crazies via Lakeshore Laments. She always seems to. Amanda Carpenter has a take also.

Enjoy!

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January 10, 2009

Taxes and spending

by thoughtfulconservative

The Chief, who I don’t think would mind being called left-of-center, reminds us of something all conservative should know.

[L]et’s make something perfectly clear: any program introduced by a legislator — no matter how well-meaning, how virtuous, how essential to the public good — costs money.

The Chief is pointing at Sen. Mary Lazich’s Silver Alert legislation, which she plans to submit and, frankly, rightly calls it hypocritical. Now perhaps the senator is looking at cutting spending elsewhere to make room for this expense, but with Wisconsin already looking at having a $5 billion deficit, it’s hard to see where this would come from.

But maybe she’s looking elsewhere. In another post Sen. Lazich wrote,

Congress is considering giving grants to states to start their own Silver Alert programs. Another bill to be introduced in Congress this month would make Silver Alert a federally-run program in every state. [Emphasis mine]

Even if a federal program, it will be paid with my taxes. Is a state tax increase bad and a federal increase good?

But as a Stateline.org article notes

Silver Alert has few opponents, although proposals in some states have been rejected because of budget concerns and worries that law enforcers already are overburdened. Some state policymakers also have cautioned that too many alerts could make the public less likely to respond. [Emphasis mine]

Popular, but concerns.

So how much will it cost? I guess we’ll have to wait for the state bureau to look at it.

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October 26, 2008

Waukesha Carnival 10-26-2008

by thoughtfulconservative

Where to begin? How about where we’re all hit–the wallet.

Dad29 exposes the Democrats plans for 401(k)s.

The Asian Badger links to a Wall Street Journal article that shows

that high tax rates on the “producers” cause dis-incentives on those who are the payors of those tax rates. At some point, they either stop producing or, move out of the country.

At Waukesha FYI, Darryl Enriquez notes that a local lady got her letter about the bailout printed in TIME magazine.

Politics are always on the mind. Kyle Prast wonders at Practically Speaking why Powell’s endorsement of Barack Obama matters.

JJ Gravelle muses in his own inimitable way about Colin Powell’s endorsement of Obama at The Daily Scoff.

Alex has a nice poll over at Hobo Springs. Go vote.

Locally, Wiggy gives us a short rant on yard signs at Wigderson’s Library & Pub.

Cindy Kilkenny at Fairly Conservative takes a critical look at Brookfield’s Vision 2035.

Meanwhile, Mayor Larry Nelson continues his steady stream of mayor memos. He’s a busy guy, I guess.

In miscellaneous posts, Bryon Houlgrave has some high school football “hits.”

MommaBlogger wonders what so secret about the 10 secrets of the effortlessly thin. You can read her thoughts at Homemaker’s Guide to the Galaxy.

At Inside New Berlin, Linda Richter informs about a year-round costume company. In New Berlin.

Find a tree? Curt Otto has reported one missing. A replacement is in the works. See Maple & Main for details.

Huckberry Dumbell adds a touch to his Ghost Blogging and Sunday Scan features. Go to Spring City Chronicle to find out.

That’s it for this week. If you see an interesting post, drop the link in a comment and I’ll add it to next week’s carnival.