Archive for ‘Republican’

July 3, 2013

Reading 7/3/2013

by thoughtfulconservative

If George Zimmerman Is Found Not Guilty, Can The American People Handle It? « TheTradingReport.

I suspect some rioting will take place if he’s found innocent.

The growing public acceptance of same-sex marriage and the legalization of marijuana are signs of that the idea of the government minding its own business — in most things — is gaining credence with the public.

via The Libertarian States of America.

And it has a map! #mapgeek

A Gallup poll has found that Obama’s Perceived Honesty, Crisis Management Key to Approval.

So there’s that.

And it’s a poll so <shrug>.

JONATHAN ALTER: There is already very little [illegal immigration] right now, if you look at statistics.

via Chris Matthews: “Republicans Don’t Like Illegal Immigration” And Democrats “Believe In Illegal Immigration” | RealClearPolitics.

Matthews’ quote is, as media is wont to do, a broad brush that attempts to polarize. One group is one side of the issue, the other group is the other side of the issue. It’s what draws viewers and henceforth sells advertising.

Although MSNBC doesn’t seem to be doing that well…

July 12, 2011

The McConnell Plan

by thoughtfulconservative

Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., offered a new plan to allow the president to demand up to $2.4 trillion in new borrowing authority by the summer of next year in three separate submissions.

via McConnell: Give Obama New Powers on Debt Limit.

You can find the details here.

Basically it

allows the president to demand up to $2.4 trillion in new borrowing authority by the summer of next year in three separate submissions.

House and Senate could disallow these requests in 15 days and the president could veto any “disallowals.”

The Heritage Foundation argues against it. The Wall Street Journal seems to like it. Zogby says voters will blame the president.

Republicans had already been called out by The Economist:

IN THREE weeks, if there is no political deal, the American government will go into default. Not, one must pray, on its sovereign debt. But the country will have to stop paying someone: perhaps pensioners, or government suppliers, or soldiers. That would be damaging enough at a time of economic fragility. And the longer such a default went on, the greater the risk of provoking a genuine bond crisis would become.

The Journal op/ed sees what’s happening:

Mr. Obama is trying to present Republicans with a Hobson’s choice: Either repudiate their campaign pledge by raising taxes, or take the blame for any economic turmoil and government shutdown as the U.S. nears a debt default. In the former case Mr. Obama takes the tax issue off the table and demoralizes the tea party for 2012, and in the latter he makes Republicans share the blame for 9.2% unemployment.

The McConnell Plan avoids both of these.

It may work…

June 16, 2011

This is the price of apathy?

by thoughtfulconservative

I usually don’t take on Community Columnists at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. I was one once. But the one in Thursday’s paper is useful for a point, because it reflects what I see in liberal thought toward conservatives.

The 2010 election saw a full 50% of the electorate sit on their hands and do nothing. Among those who did vote, one has to wonder just how much effort was put into understanding the issues, the proposed solutions and the historical performance of the candidates.

via This is the price of apathy – JSOnline.

I’ve written about apathy before, even as a member of the Community Columnists. However, Mr. Bell is not really writing about apathy.

The Republicans got elected promising jobs and have pulled a fast one on all of us. Behind the foible of “budget,” they used the issue to drive home every bit of longed for right-wing goodies – and now, some who voted for them feel duped.

Yes, this is another screed about those no good Republicans.

What was that whole brown bag lunch that the liberals liked to ridicule so much, all about anyway?

That’s right. The budget.

How soon they forget.

But that seems to be the liberal tactic, that somehow the Republicans pulled a bait and switch on the people of Wisconsin.

“Jobs was what the Republicans promised.”

Well, yeah and the brown bag lunch. Living within your means.

Hmmm, I wonder if Mr. Bell was truly “duped?” Because the article sure didn’t give the feel of one who had been duped.

So who’s doing the duping?

As usual, what it comes down to is that the GOP lied and stupid people voted for them.

Same ol’ same ol’.

June 15, 2011

Wait, GOP has a gay presidential candidate?

by thoughtfulconservative

Openly gay candidate Fred Karger will not be on the stage next Monday night when CNN broadcasts the first major debate of the 2012 presidential campaign.

via Gay presidential candidate left out, again | Keen News Service.

Those Republicans. So narrow minded.

…ironically, GOProud, a gay conservative group, has being speaking out in support of allowing Johnson into the debate while saying nothing about Karger, who served as an adviser to President Reagan.

Hold it! A gay conservative group is not speaking out about this? It’s getting more confusing.

A CNN poll conducted last month did include Karger, but zero percent of 473 Republicans or Republican-leaning voters surveyed chose him. Fox News included Karger in April, but only one percent of 322 Republican registered voters supported him.

I suppose you need some kind of criteria or else the stage might get a little crowded. As it was, they barely had time to answer all the questions. Limit of 1 minute per question and 30 seconds for followups? Puhleeze.

Anyway back to the item at hand. I thought those Republicans were homophobes. Have the Democrats ever had a gay candidate?

June 13, 2011

In which I give my thoughts on this whole #wiunion thing

by thoughtfulconservative

Probably no one will be completely happy with this post. That’s OK.

There’s been a great political division in Wisconsin since Gov. Scott Walker announced plans to do away with collective bargaining for state employees. Most of my readers are well acquainted with what’s been going on in protests, court cases and legislative shenanigans.

On the whole I agree with Walker’s budget (and other) plans including some of the things that the union’s are protesting so vigorously. But I also disagree with some of the things the GOP is trying to accomplish.

I used to be radically anti-union. My father died during a strike at the place he worked. No doubt the stress of not working was part, part not all, of the trigger. He also smoked and was slightly overweight which were probably the main causes.

But in seeing the way some, some, not all, employers work, and the government is an employer in this situation, I find that I cannot be totally anti-union. Unions do good work for workers. Safety, wages, etc., are the result of union advocacy. And in spite of what you’ve heard, employers are not really looking out for the best interests of their employees.

But I do think that benefits should not be part of a collective bargaining arrangement. Oh, I know why it’s happened; benefits are a way to “sweeten the pot,” to help make a bargaining agreement palatable.

And I think one should have an option about whether to join a union or not. Yeah, I know that unions are why the wage benefit package is available to an employee; I guess I just don’t like the idea of being forced to do something. That should provide fodder for discussion.

I realize my poor little blog is going to have much influence on the public debate long since enjoined. But I do wish Walker and the GOP had done things a little bit differently.

Oh, and “union thugs” or other derogatory terms will not make it into my writings on the subject.

Well, I guess that’s it for now. Unless something else comes up…

January 11, 2011

I Wonder…

by thoughtfulconservative

I wonder sometimes…

Only those on a desert island (who wouldn’t be reading this anyway) haven’t heard about the tragic shooting of many people including the serious wounding of a US Congresswoman and the killing of a Federal judge.

The shooter by all appearances is a troubled young such as those who have dotted the American landscape, pretty much since the republic was founded.

Recriminations began. Those on the left blamed inflamed political rhetoric centering on a well-know few. Concerns about gun violence were aired as well, citing the right’s continued insistence on 2nd amendment rights.

One network even talked about such words as “campaign,” “war room,” and “target” used in a political sense.

Conservatives (and others) responded by saying that the shooter had no political beliefs, and that controls on speech and guns is a typical knee-jerk reaction.

Who’s right?

I wish I knew.

Really.

Gun violence appalls me. Yes, I still support 2nd amendment rights because it’s in the Constitution. But I wonder if we could still do something beyond the laws on the books.

I’m not much into over-the-top rhetoric either. It’s not that I don’t think Coulter, Beck, Limbaugh, Sykes, Belling, McKenna don’t say good things. It’s just the way they say them sometimes turns me off. The same with the bastions of liberal thought.

I just wonder what it would be like if they toned it down sometimes.

I’m not naive. Both sides hold their positions and think they are right. Strong political rhetoric has been a feature of the American political scene many times over the years. And both sides are guilty of it. Don’t make me link to them; I can.

But I just wonder, what it would be like.

Not that I think it will happen or even should happen. I certainly value my 1st amendment rights too highly to listen to any proposal to limit that, even for the biggest jerk IMHO, of this whole mess, Fred Phelps, who is planning on demonstrating at some of the funerals.

But I do wonder what it would be like, if we really believed that the other side loved their country just as much as we do and just have different ideas than we do about how to make our country great.

Yeah, we differ, sometimes vehemently, and I’m no different than anyone else.

I just wonder…