Archive for ‘History’

April 11, 2010

From the “What was he thinking?” files

by thoughtfulconservative

Gov. Robert F. McDonnell, reviving a controversy that had been dormant for eight years, has declared that April will be Confederate History Month in Virginia, a move that angered civil rights leaders Tuesday but that political observers said would strengthen his position with his conservative base.

via McDonnell’s Confederate History Month proclamation irks civil rights leaders.

Who in the world thought this was a good idea?

If you want to declare something, how about “Civil War History Month?”

So much for an up and coming Republican.

How many times can they shoot themselves in the foot?

September 11, 2009

Honoring 9/11 victims

by thoughtfulconservative

UPDATE: For the 10th anniversary, I gave the men their own post. You can find Scott’s here and George’s here.

Today is the 8th anniversary of that tragic day. As I thought of making my comeback to blogging, I thought no greater post could I make than to once again honor those who perished that day. So I’m not starting with politics. As I did 3 years ago, I gave my blog a simpler theme and limited it to showing one post.

First, I honor Scott Hazelcorn, an employee at Cantor Fitzgerald. Here’s what I posted last year.

“…Hazelcorn, 29, was a trader of long-term treasury bonds at Cantor Fitzgerald; his girlfriend, Amy Callahan, was a special-education teacher. The pair had plans for a summer camp for needy kids. Scott often told his parents that he wanted to buy an ice cream truck, so he could hear the squeals of children all day.”

This year, I also asked to remember someone else so I could learn about them. The name I received was George A. Llanes. George worked for Carr Futures on the 92nd floor of World Trade Center North tower. A poignant post by his step dad can be found here.

Google books has part of the book Portraits of 9/11 which starts off with,

George Llanes was a sensitive, studious child, the kind that classmates often teased.

George was an only child and didn’t move out of his parents house until he was nearly 34, shortly before his death, because he had started smoking and he wanted to get a dog, both of which would give his mother allergy attacks.

It appears that George was a funny guy cracking jokes and making people laugh. Y146236portou can read tributes to him here.

He was also a poet. He had given his mother a bound copy of his poems and when they cleaned out his apartment after his death, they found poems everywhere.

It was Mr. Llanes devotion to his dog, that led to his death. The dog,

a pug named Mae Mae, persuaded him to rejigger his work schedule. He switched to a schedule of 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. from an ordinary one of 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., despite a lifelong aversion to getting up early.

Had he been on his normal schedule, George would have not yet been at work on that fateful morning.

Two men. One sunny and outgoing. The other, a shy poet. Both dead much too early.

This day is Scott’s and George’s.

Project 2996 is the driving force behind these tributes. Here is their Facebook page. If you’re on Facebook, become a fan. If you have a blog, post a tribute. If you don’t, you can still honor a victim.

February 6, 2009

Didn’t we fight a war about this?

by thoughtfulconservative

9 US States Declare Sovreignty

I believe this is called secession, and I’m pretty sure we fought a war over this. So why is it coming up again?

On a somewhat related note,  Human Events offered a book The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War which looks designed to show the North and her leaders did nothing right and the South and her leaders did nothing wrong regarding the Civil War.

It will show

Why Robert E. Lee had a higher regard for African Americans than Lincoln did

How, if there had been no Civil War, the South would have abolished slavery peaceably (as every other country in the Western Hemisphere did in the nineteenth century)

How the Confederate States of America might have helped the Allies win World War I sooner.

Leading Northern generals–like McClellan and Sherman–hated abolitionists

Bombing people “back to the Stone Age” got its start with the Federal siege of Vicksburg

General Sherman professed not to know which was “the greater evil”: slavery or democracy

Stonewall Jackson founded a Sunday school for slaves where he taught them how to read

General James Longstreet fought the Battle of Sharpsburg in his carpet slippers

Is this really “the truth of the Civil War?”

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February 3, 2009

Fifty year anniversary of “The Day The Music Died”

by thoughtfulconservative

(H/T According to Coop).

I wasn’t a big Holly, Richardson or Valens fan although I remember the songs, but I did like “American Pie” by Don McLean. Shortly after it came out a DJ recorded an annotated version. It was similar to this one.

Are any of them accurate? Who knows? Only McLean knows for sure and I’ve never heard him help to interpret his song.

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January 28, 2009

Challenger disaster anniversary

by thoughtfulconservative

Ed Morrissey has video at Hot Air about the disaster and President Reagan’s speech on it.

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January 28, 2009

Apollo I and Challenger

by thoughtfulconservative

Hot Air reminds us

Forty-one years ago today, astronauts Gus Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chafee perished in a capsule fire that almost derailed the Apollo program and our eventual triumph on the Moon. Twenty-three years ago tomorrow, we lost seven more astronauts in the Challenger explosion — Michael J. Smith, Dick Scobee, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Gregory Jarvis, Judith Resnik, and teacher Christa McAuliffe.

As a science geek when I was younger (and before they used “geek” or “nerd” to describe us), I followed the space program religiously. Being close to the Kennedy Space Center was a bonus.

I was overseas when the Challenger tragedy occured and had to follow the news on radio.

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